W CS 11

Imperialism (1800-1914)

The industrialized nations embarked upon a competition for overseas empires that had profound implications for the entire world. This “new imperialism” focused on the underdeveloped world and led to the domination and exploitation of Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Content Statement

11. Imperialism involved land acquisition, extraction of raw materials, spread of Western values and maintenance of political control.

Content Elaborations

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, European countries competed to establish colonies in Africa and Asia. Raw materials needed for their growing industries were extracted from the colonies.

Imperialism resulted in the spread of Western values (e.g., religion, customs, ways of governing).

Some European powers (e.g., France, Belgium) preferred direct control over the colonies they established during this period. A pattern of paternalism reflected a European belief that Africans should be governed by the European colonizers and protected like children.

Some European powers (e.g., Great Britain, the Netherlands) preferred indirect control over their colonies, using local systems of authority. They felt that working with the local native leaders would lessen the possibility of revolts and would encourage the colonized to assimilate western traditions (e.g., culture, governing).

European powers used spheres of influence to establish economic control in China.

Expectations for Learning

Describe how imperialism involved land acquisition, extraction of raw materials, the spread of Western values and maintenance of political control.